I am a lawyer in Abbotsford, British Columbia handling Wills, Estates, Real Estate, and Business Law.

Joint Tenancy's accessory, a Power of Attorney.

It is common for couples to purchase a home jointly with a spouse (via marriage or common-law) or even a close friend. One of the main advantages of joint tenancy is that it provides each other with a right of survivorship on death, saving approximately 1.6% on probate fees if one of the owners die, and keeping the home out of probate and away from potential wills variation actions.

BC's sensible real estate system

At the office today, I assisted a client who is purchasing property in Saskatchewan. As part of the sale, not only was the client required to fill out documents to purchase property, but they also had to fill out a rental agreement to live in the property between the day when their purchase completed until the time when the registration system officially recognized their sale. Additionally, they had to prepare documents to "transfer back" property to the sellers in case the sale fell through, along with various affidavits to accompany it.

Establishing a Legal Framework for E-voting in Canada

This paper was written by Dr. Bryan Schwartz and myself and published by Elections Canada in 2013. Our goal in drafting this paper was not to recommend internet voting or make a conclusion on the risks but rather to make recommendations about what legal framework and regulations should be in place prior to introducing e-voting in order to mitigate the risks.

Basics:

Social Incrimination Paper

Dr. Bryan Schwartz and I prepared this paper originally in 2011, where a slightly longer paper was presented to Manitoba's Crown Defence Conference. This modified version was published in 2012 in the Manitoba Law Journal (36 Man. L.J. 221). While the law is constantly evolving and recent developments should be taken into account, this piece provides a broad survey of how various evidence was being used and some of the issues courts in Canada and the U.S considered.

Intro:

Community Contributed Companies

British Columbia has launched a new hybrid business model, the community contribution company (C3 or CCC). These companies allow investors to put assets into a company knowing that the majority of the profits and assets will be preserved for social good, while still allowing a smaller dividend to flow back to share holders.

While the tax benefits are modest as best, this allow the less dragon like investor pick a notable project.